Research reports

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Following is a list of research reports written by CORE Staff. You may download the PDF versions of these reports.

New entrants classrooms in the re-making

A classroom research project on the development of a key competencies play-based curriculum at Mairehau Primary School in Christchurch.

New entrants classrooms in the re-making (PDF, 2.1 MB) (2015)

Kaikohekohe Education Trust Initiative

A research story, told through the voices of students and teachers, about changes to school and learning as the result of a community-wide initiative.

Kaikohekohe Education Trust Initiative (PDF, 1.4 MB) (2015)

Virtual Learning as an Impetus for Educational Change Charting a Way Forward for Learning in New Zealand

In this report, we describe the long history of distance education in New Zealand and describe two recent reports that outlined potential future directions for virtual learning organisations in New Zealand. We also consolidate those visions – along with recent educational developments – to chart a vision for the future of education in New Zealand through virtual learning.

Virtual Learning as an Impetus for Educational Change Charting a Way Forward for Learning in New Zealand (PDF, 1.6 MB) (2013)

Analysis of Feedback: Shaping Education Engagement Process

This report synthesises the feedback gathered from Shaping Education project. It involved a number of facilitated focus groups as part of the community engagement process, from early childhood to tertiary, and included public input that was gathered on the Ministry of Education website. This gave an opportunity for children to have input alongside the voice of independent focus groups and written submissions.

Analysis of Feedback: Shaping Education Engagement Process (PDF, 1.8 MB) (2011)

The scoping of participation in early childhood education and gaps in education provision in Christchurch East

This report was commissioned by the Ministry of Education to take a broad view of and report on the impact of the Sept 2010, Feb and June 2011 earthquakes on the participation of children in early childhood education (ECE), specifically in relation to the provision of education for children in the east of Christchurch. These findings cover the outcomes of six areas investigated in the scoping project: population movement, ECE participation, ECE capacity, financial impact, ECE staff, children and family/whanau wellbeing and recovery strategies.

The scoping of participation in early childhood education and gaps in education provision in Christchurch East (PDF, 4.1 MB) (2011)

Early childhood education information communication technology professional learning (ECE ICT PL)

Fifty-six early childhood educators investigated particular aspects of e-learning. At the end of the project, the centres involved wrote a reflective report that demonstrated how a range of ICTs had been utilised to improve learning outcomes for children, communities, and teachers in an early childhood education setting. At three points during the project (the beginning, the mid-point, and the end of the project), teachers were surveyed about their e-learning practices, and the data was analysed to compare the changes in teachers and services eLearning practices over time.

Early childhood education information communication technology professional learning (ECE ICT PL) (2010)

To iPad or not to iPad?

In this pilot investigation, the authors observed how two early childhood services (one kindergarten and one childcare centre) used iPads to extend the range of learning opportunities they offer for children up to five years old. The authors explored some of the reasons these devices might be used by early childhood teachers.

To iPad or not to iPad? (PDF, 111 KB) (2010)

 

EPS1: A self-evaluation tool for teachers

The Educational Positioning System (EPS 1) was developed as an online tool to identify the ways in which schools are supporting learning about, with or through ICTs. The EPS system was trialled in nine schools to find out how useful teachers found the system for promoting a culture of professional learning and critical self-reflection.

EPS1: A self-evaluation tool for teachers

Disrupting the boundaries of teaching and learning: How digital devices became a resource for transformative change in a time of crisis

This report discusses findings from The Pegasus Digital Devices Project, an initiative of the Greater Christchurch School Network (GCSN), in response to the earthquakes of Christchurch in 2010 and 2011. The earthquakes left unprecedented damage to infrastructure particularly in the central business district and in the eastern suburbs. Three years after the earthquakes these suburbs were still coming to terms with the consequences of this tragedy on the community and its schools. Infrastructure was still down, schools were facing mergers and closures and the community was concerned for the wellbeing and education of students living in the area.

In 2012, the GCSN worked with school principals to identify needs and plan a programme of work, then in 2013 they secured funding to restore wireless networks to schools and provide 11 schools with a total of 600 digital devices. Additional funding was obtained to ensure that schools and teachers could be supported with professional learning (PL) throughout the 2013 school year. Initially PL supported the more technical aspects of the roll out of so many devices, but very quickly the focus shifted to how devices could be used to enhance student learning. The project was named the Pegasus Digital Devices Project, as the eastern suburbs most damaged by the earthquakes, sit within the Pegasus Bay region.

This study was funded by the New Zealand Ministry of Education (MOE), through the Te Toi Tupu1 (TTT) Digi Advisors programme and carried out by CORE Education (CORE). The report outlines how the project came about, who was involved, how the devices were integrated into schools, and the learning and change that occurred for teachers, students and the community as a result. The Pegasus Digital Devices Project, developed and evolved out of the combined efforts of many concerned citizens and educators, and so it has been a collaborative venture. The kaupapa within this work is for transformation, and so equity is prominent in the project design and conclusions, which have been shaped around the voices and stories of those involved. This is their story, told through the dialogue, reflections and narratives of practice.

Disrupting the boundaries of teaching and learning: How digital devices became a resource for transformative change in a time of crisis (Full report) (PDF, 1.5 MB)