Te Mako Orzecki

Content Editor and Kaihuawaere Ngaio Māori

M: 021 212 0220
P: 0800 267 301
E: temako.orzecki@core-ed.ac.nz
Region: Wellington

Te Mako Orzecki

Qualifications

Graduate of Te Pīnakitanga o te Reo Kairangi – Te Wānanga o Aotearoa
Bachelor of Education – Wellington Teachers College of Education
Diploma of Māori Studies – Massey University

Professional profile

Te Mako Orzecki – of Ngāti Wehi Wehi, Ngāti Raukawa ki te Tonga, and Polish descent – is a content editor and developer of Māori medium resources.

Te Mako works as an online/offline facilitator in the areas of te reo Māori, Aotearoa New Zealand's histories, cultural capability, and Te Tiriti o Waitangi.

Te Mako is also a content manager for Kahu Putoi, an online resource space for teachers. Te Mako’s most recent projects included the;

  • Connect series journals for Aotearoa/ New Zealand Histories (Māori medium)
  • Te Hāpaitanga coaching and mentoring programme
  • Te Tiriti o Waitangi and cultural capabilities presentations and workshops
  • Te Reo Puāwai and Te Reo Manahua Māori language programmes with various organisations
  • Online content manager for the TKI Channel support team.

Expertise

  • Online/offline facilitation
  • Māori advisor
  • Content development, editing, loading, and writing
  • Quality assurance of online teaching materials
  • Reviewing of websites

Conference presentations

2020 History Slam (localised curriculum) presentation/workshops, Wellington
2019 Te Tūranga o ōku Waewae/ The place of my feet presentation/workshops, Wellington
2018 Ed Summit presentation “E hoki ki tō maunga”

Publications

Due 2022 He Kōrero Tātai: Aotearoa New Zealand Māori histories
2018 Matariki, te mātahi o te tau, Te Papa

Personal statement

I grew up in Porirua in the heart of Cannons Creek. It was in an era where there was a strong sense of community. I have taken the lessons learnt from those times, along with the values of whanaungatanga from my Wehiwehi, Ngāti Raukawa whakapapa and I apply it to the work I do today.

I believe the wellbeing of a community can be measured by the relationships between young and old. I enjoy seeing tamariki Māori excel in education. I encourage the promotion and practice of whanaungatanga, manaakitanga, whakamana i te reo Māori, and tino rangatiratanga both within and outside of my work life.